Emily Mullin

Biography for Emily Mullin

Emily Mullin, Associate Editor

Before joining the Fierce life sciences team as an associate editor, Emily Mullin was a reporter at the Baltimore Business Journal, where she covered the healthcare and biotechnology industries, and a staff writer for Dorland Health, a healthcare trade publishing company based in Rockville, MD. She has served as a contributing writer to The Maryland Daily Record, where she’s covered topics ranging from neuroscience to hospital consolidation. Her business and healthcare stories have also appeared in Nephrology Times, Columbus Business First and the Cincinnati Business Courier. She is based in Washington, DC, and is a graduate of the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University. You can contact her at emullin@fiercemarkets.com and follow her on Twitter at @EmilyMFierce.

Articles by Emily Mullin

Mutated poliovirus found to beat vaccine protection

Though polio has been nearly eradicated from the globe, researchers have made a troubling discovery that underscores the need to boost vaccination rates in countries that have seen recent outbreaks as well as develop new, more potent vaccines.

Glaxo's Ebola vaccine trial set to begin in September

As the Ebola outbreak continues to claim victims in West Africa, governments and industry alike are racing toward a therapeutic or preventive drug that could help halt its deadly spread and avert future human crises involving the virus.

Measles vaccination more likely when child's, not society's, benefits are stressed

As the U.S. continues to experience the highest number of measles cases this year since the highly contagious viral illness was eliminated nationwide in 2000, health officials and researchers are looking for ways to keep vaccination rates in check.

Chikungunya vaccine protects against virus in small Phase I study

With recent outbreaks in the Caribbean and the Pacific, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is concerned that the number of chikungunya cases among travelers will continue to rise. But results from an early-stage clinical trial point to a promising vaccine that may be able to prevent transmission of the disease.

Glaxo quietly edges toward Ebola vaccine but clinical barriers remain

As Africa continues to experience the most severe Ebola outbreak in the disease's short history, the World Health Organization has deemed it ethical to offer unregistered interventions as potential treatments or preventive therapies, including investigational vaccines.

Sanofi's high-dose Fluzone beats standard-dose version in protecting seniors

Sanofi appealed to the FDA to change the labeling of its high-dose Fluzone vaccine to reflect superior efficacy data in people aged over 65, and now it has fresh trial results to back up its case that Fluzone High-Dose provides better protection in individuals in this age group compared to traditional flu jabs.

NIH: Ebola vaccine trial could begin as early as September

The U.S. National Institutes of Health is set to begin an early-stage clinical trial for an Ebola vaccine in September, according to reports.

Kenya study reveals new malaria vaccine targets

Although GlaxoSmithKline has submitted its malaria vaccine to the European Medicines Agency for approval, the jab hasn't shown as much promise as hoped, underscoring the need for a better understanding of the malaria parasite and how it affects the human immune system.

Merck aims to boost HPV vaccination rates amid lagging numbers

Though Merck's Gardasil tops the company's best-selling vaccines list and has already achieved blockbuster sales, the drug giant has a long way to go if it wants to boost U.S. immunization rates against human papillomavirus.

Aduro nabs FDA 'breakthrough' nod for pancreatic cancer vaccine combo

Aduro BioTech's GVAX, a previously failed cancer vaccine, is finding new life in a combination treatment that the Berkeley-based company is testing in patients with pancreatic cancer.